Art Critiques and Getting the Most from Input

Today, I’m featuring an article from one of my favourite Youtube A young artist exhibits their work for the first time. ...and a well known art critic is in attendance. The critic says, "Would you like my opinion on your work?". "Yes, " say the young artist. "It's worthless," says the critic. The artist replies, "I know, but tell me anyway."watercolour tutorial artists, Steve Mitchell. He is easy to listen to and he has great advice from a lifetime of being a pro artist.

Art Critiques and Getting the Most from Input

“We all want to improve as artists don’t we? Growing as an artist is the key to more enjoyment and satisfaction as we tread this adventurous but sometimes frustrating path. Practice is a given, but what happens when we get stuck and don’t know how to improve. The brave artist seeks appropriate, constructive input and critique. Its a tougher challenge, though, than we sometimes realize. Asking someone to tell us what is wrong with our art, which is so often a personal expression of ourselves, is also risky, baring our soul to the cold frigid winds of potential rejection. So if its done, it ought to be done right. There is good input and bad input. How do you tell the difference? Here are some pointers from my experience…”

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Shaking It Up

I’ve been working a lot in watercolour the past year or so and felt I was getting into a rut. I had done some miniature paintings on the side in acrylic, with these tiny little canvasses I had lying around…
REALLY TINY!

So, I thought I would stretch myself a bit and tackle some larger pieces. The process for acrylic is opposite what it is for watercolour. Instead of painting light to dark, you go from dark to light. It’s a different way of approaching a painting and makes me SEE the subjects in a new way. This has brought me back to my formal training and all of a sudden I’m thinking up new ideas for paintings!

“It’s good as an artist to always remember to see things in a new, weird way.” 
~Tim Burton

Using (or trying) different materials is a great way to infuse new life into your art practice, to see things from a new point of view, and to jump start creativity when you feel blocked.

How to you get out of a rut, or a block?