Keeping the Flow

It would be great if I could sit down and paint everyday. In a perfect world I could crank out watercolour paintings just by sitting at the easel or desk and doing it, but life gets in the way. The phone rings, the laundry piles up, a friend needs our attention.. or we have to go to our day job. Other times a blank sheet or canvas has a way of being really intimidating. Some days the ideas don’t come easy, or the pencil or brush just will not obey the vision in one’s mind.

I’ve struggled with this.. sometimes the mojo just isn’t there.

The solution I’ve come up with is to change it up. If I’ve been working in watercolour—I’ll do an acrylic piece. If I’ve been doing a of tight realism I’ll switch to something looser, put my detail brushes away and just work with a huge brush. If I’ve been working 2D for a long time I’ll set it aside and make a piece of jewellery… if I’ve been making large pieces I’ll try my hand at miniatures… or work on my website.

Sometimes I need to get out of the studio altogether and ‘fill the well’. For me, walking in nature is the best.. or even taking my camera and shooting some urban photography.

Sometimes I need to rest. Watch a movie. Take the pressure off.

“I’ve found that the only way I can keep writing every day, year after year, is to let my mind wander into new territories. To do that, I’ve had to cultivate a kind of mental playfulness….For me, it’s been liberating to put myself in the mind of a fictitious six year-old each day, and rediscover my own curiosity. I’ve been amazed at how one ideas leads to others if I allow my mind to play and wander.”
~ Bill Watterson, Calvin & Hobbes

Learning to be gentle with ones self, change it up, take the pressure off, try new things. These are the techniques I have found work when nothing else does.

Do you have any ‘go to’ things for when nothing else is working?

Art Critiques and Getting the Most from Input

Today, I’m featuring an article from one of my favourite Youtube A young artist exhibits their work for the first time. ...and a well known art critic is in attendance. The critic says, "Would you like my opinion on your work?". "Yes, " say the young artist. "It's worthless," says the critic. The artist replies, "I know, but tell me anyway."watercolour tutorial artists, Steve Mitchell. He is easy to listen to and he has great advice from a lifetime of being a pro artist.

Art Critiques and Getting the Most from Input

“We all want to improve as artists don’t we? Growing as an artist is the key to more enjoyment and satisfaction as we tread this adventurous but sometimes frustrating path. Practice is a given, but what happens when we get stuck and don’t know how to improve. The brave artist seeks appropriate, constructive input and critique. Its a tougher challenge, though, than we sometimes realize. Asking someone to tell us what is wrong with our art, which is so often a personal expression of ourselves, is also risky, baring our soul to the cold frigid winds of potential rejection. So if its done, it ought to be done right. There is good input and bad input. How do you tell the difference? Here are some pointers from my experience…”

Read More…

Watch me paint a realistic bouquet, #2

I’m working on a realism piece and have taken snapshots of the process. I’d like to share them with you! This is the next phase.

If you have any questions or comments, I’d love to hear them…

enjoy

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I decided that I needed to pull out the flowers from the foliage. I drew in the rest of the detail in the bouquet and began with light washes of a green I made with cadmium yellow and cobalt blue. I can now see the shapes of the flowers!